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Difference between revisions of "BaSyx / Introductory Examples"

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= How to digitalize a production with Eclipse BaSyx =
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The introductory examples provide a starting point for getting started with the Eclipse BaSyx Java SDK. The overall rationale of Eclipse BaSyx is to enable digital manufacturing processes. Digital manufacturing processes are fully digitized, i.e. they have digital representatives for assets, for the process itself, and for the products. Digital representatives cover all relevant aspects of their real-world counterpart. Eclipse BaSyx realizes these digital representatives with the Asset Administration Shell (AAS). The AAS is therefore a digital substitute for an entity that is relevant for a production process. The following examples introduce Eclipse BaSyx and illustrate the use of our middleware to create a digital representative of a manufacturing process.
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In the following, for each SDK there are introductory examples provided, showcasing the different concepts in the respective SDK.
 
In the following, for each SDK there are introductory examples provided, showcasing the different concepts in the respective SDK.
= Java =
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The goal of the following examples is, to introduce core concepts and the respective infrastructure components of the Java SDK. These are:
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== Java ==
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The goal of the following examples is to introduce core concepts and the respective infrastructure components of the Eclipse BaSyx Java SDK in 6 steps. In these steps we will illustrate:
 
# [[BaSyx_/_Documentation_/_VAB | Virtual Automation Bus]]
 
# [[BaSyx_/_Documentation_/_VAB | Virtual Automation Bus]]
# [[ BaSyx_Control_Components | Control Components]]
 
 
# [[ BaSyx.HowTo.AAS | Asset Administration Shell]]
 
# [[ BaSyx.HowTo.AAS | Asset Administration Shell]]
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# [[ BaSyx_Control_Components | Control Components]]
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The Virtual Automation Bus enables end-to-end connectivity. The Asset Administration Shell is the digital representative of a device. If the AAS only provides access to sensor data then it will be a digital shadow. If it also enables controlling of the real device, it is a digital twin. The control component can be implemented in a PLC controller, and provides a unified device interface.
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'''Predondition:''' The example requires a successful installation of the [[ BaSyx_/_Download_/_Java_Setup | SDK]] and the [[ BaSyx_/_Download_/_Components_Setup | components]].
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The following example illustrates Eclipse BaSyx by creating a digital twin for one device. The device is an oven that consists of a temperature sensor and of a heater. An application will display the current state of the oven and control its operation. The oven, and its devices will be provided as simulation model to enable the self-contained execution of this device. The code can be found below:
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# Oven
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# Heater
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# Temperature sensor
  
The examples require a succesful installation of the [[ BaSyx_/_Download_/_Java_Setup | SDK]] and the [[ BaSyx_/_Download_/_Components_Setup | components]].
 
  
There are currently 5 examples, each building upon the previous one. In the end, there will be a control and data access of an oven using Asset Administration Shells and Control Components.
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There are currently 5 steps that illustrate the use of Eclipse BaSyx, each building upon the previous one. In the end, there will be a digitized oven with the ability to access its current state and to control its operation using Asset Administration Shells and Control Components.
  
* [[ BaSyx_/_Introductory_Examples_/_Java_/_Example_1 | Example 1]] - Creating the oven model and using it with the VAB
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* [[ BaSyx_/_Introductory_Examples_/_Java_/_Example_1 | Step 1]] - Creating the oven Asset Administration Shell and sub models
* [[ BaSyx_/_Introductory_Examples_/_Java_/_Example_2 | Example 2]] - Providing the model via HTTP/REST and using the Registry
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* [[ BaSyx_/_Introductory_Examples_/_Java_/_Example_2 | Step 2]] - Providing the model via HTTP/REST and using the Registry
** [[ BaSyx_/_Introductory_Examples_/_Java_/_Example_2a | Example 2a]] - Providing the model via [[ BaSyx_/_Documentation_/_VAB_/_TCP_Mapping | BaSyxTCP ]]
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** [[ BaSyx_/_Introductory_Examples_/_Java_/_Example_2a | Step 2a]] - Providing the model via [[ BaSyx_/_Documentation_/_VAB_/_TCP_Mapping | BaSyxTCP ]]
** [[ BaSyx_/_Introductory_Examples_/_Java_/_Example_2b | Example 2b]] - Providing the model via [[ BaSyx_/_Documentation_/_VAB_/_TCP_Mapping | BaSyxTCP]] and connecting via a [[ BaSyx.Gateway.Overview | gateway]]
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** [[ BaSyx_/_Introductory_Examples_/_Java_/_Example_2b | Step 2b]] - Providing the model via [[ BaSyx_/_Documentation_/_VAB_/_TCP_Mapping | BaSyxTCP]] and connecting via a [[ BaSyx.Gateway.Overview | gateway]]
* [[ BaSyx_/_Introductory_Examples_/_Java_/_Example_3 | Example 3]] - Using a Control Component for unified service interfacing
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* [[ BaSyx_/_Introductory_Examples_/_Java_/_Example_3 | Step 3]] - Using a Control Component for unified service interfacing
* [[ BaSyx_/_Introductory_Examples_/_Java_/_Example_4 | Example 4]] - Creating the AAS, registering it and exploring the HTTP-REST interface  
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* [[ BaSyx_/_Introductory_Examples_/_Java_/_Example_4 | Step 4]] - Creating the AAS, registering it and exploring the HTTP-REST interface  
* [[ BaSyx_/_Introductory_Examples_/_Java_/_Example_5 | Example 5]] - Accessing the remote AAS through the SDK
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* [[ BaSyx_/_Introductory_Examples_/_Java_/_Example_5 | Step 5]] - Accessing the remote AAS through the SDK
* [[ BaSyx_/_Introductory_Examples_/_Java_/_Example_6 | Example 6]] - Using the Off-the-Shelf-Components
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* [[ BaSyx_/_Introductory_Examples_/_Java_/_Example_6 | Step 6]] - Using the Off-the-Shelf-Components

Revision as of 10:04, 6 April 2021

How to digitalize a production with Eclipse BaSyx

The introductory examples provide a starting point for getting started with the Eclipse BaSyx Java SDK. The overall rationale of Eclipse BaSyx is to enable digital manufacturing processes. Digital manufacturing processes are fully digitized, i.e. they have digital representatives for assets, for the process itself, and for the products. Digital representatives cover all relevant aspects of their real-world counterpart. Eclipse BaSyx realizes these digital representatives with the Asset Administration Shell (AAS). The AAS is therefore a digital substitute for an entity that is relevant for a production process. The following examples introduce Eclipse BaSyx and illustrate the use of our middleware to create a digital representative of a manufacturing process.

In the following, for each SDK there are introductory examples provided, showcasing the different concepts in the respective SDK.

Java

The goal of the following examples is to introduce core concepts and the respective infrastructure components of the Eclipse BaSyx Java SDK in 6 steps. In these steps we will illustrate:

  1. Virtual Automation Bus
  2. Asset Administration Shell
  3. Control Components


The Virtual Automation Bus enables end-to-end connectivity. The Asset Administration Shell is the digital representative of a device. If the AAS only provides access to sensor data then it will be a digital shadow. If it also enables controlling of the real device, it is a digital twin. The control component can be implemented in a PLC controller, and provides a unified device interface.

Predondition: The example requires a successful installation of the SDK and the components.

The following example illustrates Eclipse BaSyx by creating a digital twin for one device. The device is an oven that consists of a temperature sensor and of a heater. An application will display the current state of the oven and control its operation. The oven, and its devices will be provided as simulation model to enable the self-contained execution of this device. The code can be found below:

  1. Oven
  2. Heater
  3. Temperature sensor


There are currently 5 steps that illustrate the use of Eclipse BaSyx, each building upon the previous one. In the end, there will be a digitized oven with the ability to access its current state and to control its operation using Asset Administration Shells and Control Components.

  • Step 1 - Creating the oven Asset Administration Shell and sub models
  • Step 2 - Providing the model via HTTP/REST and using the Registry
  • Step 3 - Using a Control Component for unified service interfacing
  • Step 4 - Creating the AAS, registering it and exploring the HTTP-REST interface
  • Step 5 - Accessing the remote AAS through the SDK
  • Step 6 - Using the Off-the-Shelf-Components

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