Difference between revisions of "Jetty/Howto/Use Jetty with Ant"

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{{Jetty Howto
 
{{Jetty Howto
 
| introduction =
 
| introduction =
The Ant Jetty plugin is available in the /extras/ant location. This plugin makes it possible to start a Jetty web server directly from the Ant build script, and, to embed the Jetty web server inside your build process. Its purpose is to provide almost the same functionality as the Jetty plugin for Maven: dynamic application reloading, working directly on web application sources, and a tight integration with the build system.
+
The Ant Jetty plugin is in the [http://git.codehaus.org/gitweb.cgi?p=jetty-project.git;a=summary codehouse trunk] in the <tt>jetty-ant</tt> module. This plugin makes it possible to start a Jetty web server directly from the Ant build script, and, to embed the Jetty web server inside your build process. Its purpose is to provide almost the same functionality as the Jetty plugin for Maven: dynamic application reloading, working directly on web application sources, and a tight integration with the build system.
  
A [http://svn.codehaus.org/jetty-contrib/jetty/branches/jetty-6.1.22-z5/contrib/jetty-ant-demo demo] for the Ant Jetty plugin is provided in jetty-contrib repository. It's good to compile Jetty before running these tests, because the demo depends on Jetty JARs from the Maven repository. Alternatively, you can download these JARs manually from one of the [http://maven.apache.org/guides/mini/guide-mirror-settings.html Maven repositories]. Please see build.xml file in jetty-ant-demo folder for a list of required JARs.
 
  
Modifying <tt>build.xml</tt> from jetty-ant-demo is also the easiest way to start playing with this plugin.
 
 
}}
 
}}
==Starting Ant==
+
==Preparation==
  
The Ant plugin depends on Jetty JARs, and so far it's necessary to build Jetty and then the Ant plugin directly from sources. Here's how it goes:
+
You will need a [http://download.eclipse.org/jetty/ jetty distribution] and the [http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/org/mortbay/jetty/jetty-ant/ jetty-ant jar] in order to set up your project for ant to run jetty:
  
# Get the latest jetty sources from http://dist.codehaus.org/jetty/
+
# Get a [http://download.eclipse.org/jetty/ jetty distribution] and unpack it the local filesystem
# Unpack jetty and build it with <tt>mvn install</tt> (If you don't have Maven yet, get it from http://maven.apache.org/)
+
# Get the [http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/org/mortbay/jetty/jetty-ant/ jetty-ant jar]
# Go to the extras/ant/ folder and build the ant plugin with 'mvn install'
+
# Make a directory in your project called <tt>jetty-lib/</tt>
# Go to <your M2 repo root>/repository/org/eclipse/jetty/jetty-ant and get the jetty-ant plugin JAR.
+
# Copy all of the jars in your jetty distribution's <tt>lib</tt> directory, and all its subdirectories, into your new <tt>jetty-lib</tt> dir. When copying the jars, DON'T preserve the jetty distro's <tt>lib</tt> dir hierarchy - all the jars should be directly inside your <tt>jetty-lib</tt> dir.
# Get these files to run Jetty with JSP/Servlets support (find these in <your M2 repo root>/repository/org/eclipse/jetty):
+
# Also copy the [http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/org/mortbay/jetty/jetty-ant/ jetty-ant jar]  you downloaded earlier into the <tt>jetty-lib</tt> dir.
#* jetty.jar
+
# Make a directory in your project called <tt>jetty-temp</tt>
#* jetty-util.jar
+
 
#* jetty-plus.jar
+
Now you're ready to edit or create your Ant build.xml file.
#* jetty-naming.jar
+
#* servlet-api-2.5.jar
+
#* jsp-api-2.1.jar
+
#* jsp-2.1.jar
+
#* and core-3.1.1.jar from <M2 repository>/org/eclipse/jdt/core/3.1.1/
+
# Put all the JARs inside one lib directory (let's say jetty-lib).
+
  
 
==Preparing the <tt>build.xml file</tt>==
 
==Preparing the <tt>build.xml file</tt>==
  
Let's start with an empty build.xml:  
+
Let's start with an empty <tt>build.xml</tt>:  
  
 
<source lang="xml">
 
<source lang="xml">
Line 61: Line 53:
 
</source>
 
</source>
  
Starting jetty on port 8080 is then a simple matter of executing <tt>ant jetty.run</tt> from the command line.
+
This is the minimal configuration need. You can now start jetty.
 +
 
 +
==Starting Jetty via Ant==
 +
At the command line do:
 +
 
 +
<tt>
 +
ant jetty.run
 +
</tt>
  
 
==Deploying web applications==
 
==Deploying web applications==
  
To add web applications to the Jetty web server, now put extra <tt>webapp</tt> tags inside <tt>jetty</tt> tag. Notice, that a <tt>tempDirectory''</tt> attribute has been added to the '<tt>jetty'</tt> task to specify where temporary files are stored.  
+
To add web applications to the Jetty web server, now put extra <tt>webapp</tt> tags inside <tt>jetty</tt> tag. Notice, that a <tt>tempDirectory</tt> attribute has been added to the <tt>jetty</tt> task to specify where temporary files are stored.  
  
 
<source lang="xml">  
 
<source lang="xml">  
Line 82: Line 81:
 
</source>
 
</source>
  
You can put many <tt>webapp</tt> tags inside ''jetty'' tag, thus deploying many web applications simultaneously.
+
You can put many <tt>webapp</tt> tags inside <tt>jetty</tt> tag, thus deploying many web applications simultaneously.
 +
 
 +
===A Special Note on Using JSPs with JSTL Or Other Taglibs ===
 +
 
 +
If your webapp uses a taglib that should be found on the container classpath (such as JSTL) you will need to pass in some extra information to the webapp to tell jetty which container jars can contain the taglibs. This is defined as a set of jar name patterns.
 +
 
 +
If you are using JSTL, and are using the jars provided by the standard jetty distribution, the JSTL taglibs are located in the jar named something like <tt>org.apache.taglibs.standard.glassfish_1.2.0.xxxx.jar</tt> (where xxx is replaced by a specific version number).
 +
 
 +
The following pattern defines all jars that contain the string "jsp-api" or "jsp" or "taglibs" as jars that will be searched at runtime for taglibs:
 +
 
 +
<tt>.*/.*jsp-api-[^/]*\.jar$|.*/.*jsp-[^/]*\.jar$|.*/.*taglibs[^/]*\.jar$</tt>
 +
 
 +
 
 +
This pattern should be added to your <webApp/> declaration as the value of a context attribute named <tt>org.eclipse.jetty.server.webapp.ContainerIncludeJarPattern</tt>. Here's how the modified build.xml file looks now:
 +
 
 +
<source lang="xml">
 +
<project name="Jetty-Ant integration test" basedir=".">
 +
  <path id="jetty.plugin.classpath">
 +
    <fileset dir="jetty-lib" includes="*.jar"/>
 +
  </path>
 +
  <taskdef classpathref="jetty.plugin.classpath" resource="tasks.properties" loaderref="jetty.loader" />
 +
 +
  <target name="jetty.run">
 +
    <jetty tempDirectory="jetty-temp">
 +
      <webApp name="webapp1" warfile="webapp1.war" contextpath="/webapp1">
 +
        <attributes>
 +
          <attribute name="org.eclipse.jetty.server.webapp.ContainerIncludeJarPattern" value=".*/.*jsp-api-[^/]*\.jar$|.*/.*jsp-[^/]*\.jar$|.*/.*taglibs[^/]*\.jar$"/>
 +
        </attributes>
 +
      </webApp>
 +
    </jetty>
 +
  </target>
 +
</project>
 +
</source>
  
 
==Plugin syntax==
 
==Plugin syntax==
Line 88: Line 119:
 
====There are many ways to configure <tt>jetty</tt> tasks:====
 
====There are many ways to configure <tt>jetty</tt> tasks:====
  
* '<tt>tempDirectory</tt>–specifies the Jetty temporary web directory:  
+
* <tt>tempDirectory</tt>–specifies the Jetty temporary web directory:  
 
<source lang="xml">
 
<source lang="xml">
 
  <jetty tempDirectory="jetty-temp" />
 
  <jetty tempDirectory="jetty-temp" />
Line 96: Line 127:
 
  <jetty ... requestLog="your.fancy.request.logger"/>
 
  <jetty ... requestLog="your.fancy.request.logger"/>
 
</source>
 
</source>
* <tt>jettyXml</tt>–applies additional configuration via a standard jetty.xml file:  
+
* <tt>jettyXml</tt>–applies additional configuration via a standard <tt>jetty.xml</tt> file:  
 
<source lang="xml">  
 
<source lang="xml">  
 
  <jetty ... jettyXml="path/to/jetty.xml"/>
 
  <jetty ... jettyXml="path/to/jetty.xml"/>
Line 119: Line 150:
 
  </jetty>
 
  </jetty>
 
</source>  
 
</source>  
* <tt>userRealms</tt> - adds authentication via user "realms":  
+
* <tt>loginServices</tt> - adds authentication via user "realms":  
 
<source lang="xml">>  
 
<source lang="xml">>  
  <typedef name="jdbcRealm" classname="org.eclipse.jetty.security.HashUserRealm"
+
  <typedef name="hashLoginService" classname="org.eclipse.jetty.security.HashLoginService"
 
                   classpathref="jetty.plugin.classpath" loaderref="jetty.loader" />
 
                   classpathref="jetty.plugin.classpath" loaderref="jetty.loader" />
 
  ...
 
  ...
 
  <jetty ...>
 
  <jetty ...>
   <userRealms>
+
   <loginServices>
     <userRealm name="realm1" config="path/to/realm/config" />
+
     <hashLoginService name="realm1" config="path/to/realm/config" />
   </userRealms>
+
   </loginServices>
 
  </jetty>
 
  </jetty>
 
</source>
 
</source>
  
====There are also many ways to configure web applications with ''webapp'' tag:====
+
====There are also many ways to configure web applications with <tt>webapp</tt> tag:====
  
* <tt>name</tt>–name of a web application, which is used by DefaultServlet to display application description  
+
* <tt>name</tt>–name of a web application, which is used by <tt>DefaultServlet</tt> to display application description:
 
<source lang="xml">  
 
<source lang="xml">  
 
  <jetty ...>
 
  <jetty ...>
Line 145: Line 176:
 
  </jetty>
 
  </jetty>
 
</source>
 
</source>
* <tt>contextPath</tt>–a context path a particular web application will be deployed to, and thus where it will be accessible (<tt>http://localhost:8080/webapp</tt> in this case):  
+
* <tt>contextPath</tt>–a context path a particular web application will be deployed to, and thus where it will be accessible (<nowiki>http://localhost:8080/webapp</nowiki> in this case):  
 
<source lang="xml">  
 
<source lang="xml">  
 
  <jetty ...>
 
  <jetty ...>
Line 151: Line 182:
 
  </jetty>
 
  </jetty>
 
</source>
 
</source>
* <tt>jettyEnvXml</tt>–path to [http://docs.codehaus.org/display/JETTY/jetty-env.xml jettyEnv.xml file with JNDI resource declarations]
+
* <tt>jettyEnvXml</tt>–path to [[Jetty/Reference/jetty-env.xml|jettyEnv.xml file with JNDI resource declarations]]:
 
<source lang="xml">  
 
<source lang="xml">  
 
  <jetty ...>
 
  <jetty ...>
Line 157: Line 188:
 
  </jetty>
 
  </jetty>
 
</source>
 
</source>
* <tt>webXml</tt>–path to web.xml file. If not specified, the default (location-of-war-file/WEB-INF/web.xml) location is used:  
+
* <tt>webXml</tt>–path to <tt>web.xml</tt> file. If not specified, the default (<tt>location-of-war-file/WEB-INF/web.xml</tt>) location is used:  
 
<source lang="xml">  
 
<source lang="xml">  
 
  <jetty ...>
 
  <jetty ...>
Line 163: Line 194:
 
  </jetty>
 
  </jetty>
 
</source>
 
</source>
* '<tt>scanTargets</tt> and '<tt>scanIntervalSeconds'</tt>–points to special files/folders that need to be scanned, and specifies scanner interval in seconds. If any of the files changes, the web application is automatically reloaded. You can adjust interval and scanned files per web application.
+
* <tt>scanTargets</tt> and <tt>scanIntervalSeconds</tt>–points to special files/folders that need to be scanned, and specifies scanner interval in seconds. If any of the files changes, the web application is automatically reloaded. You can adjust interval and scanned files per web application.
  
{{note|All files included with <classes/> or <lib/> tags are''automatically'' scanned for changes if you provide <tt>scanIntervalSeconds</tt> parameter in the <tt><jetty/></tt> tag. There's no need to add them using the <tt><scanTargets/></tt> section.}}
+
{{note|All files included with <classes/> or <lib/> tags are ''automatically'' scanned for changes if you provide <tt>scanIntervalSeconds</tt> parameter in the <tt><jetty/></tt> tag. There's no need to add them using the <tt><scanTargets/></tt> section.}}
 
<source lang="xml">
 
<source lang="xml">
 
  <jetty ...>
 
  <jetty ...>
Line 183: Line 214:
 
  </jetty>
 
  </jetty>
 
</source>
 
</source>
* <tt>classes</tt>–specifies which folder contains web application classes (treated as WEB-INF/classes folder). Multiple ''classes'' tags are allowed.  
+
* <tt>classes</tt>–specifies which folder contains web application classes (treated as <tt>WEB-INF/classes</tt> folder). Multiple <tt>classes</tt> tags are allowed.  
 
<source lang="xml">  
 
<source lang="xml">  
 
  <jetty ...>
 
  <jetty ...>
Line 191: Line 222:
 
  </jetty>
 
  </jetty>
 
</source>
 
</source>
* '<tt>connectors</tt>–specifies additional web application connectors
+
* <tt>connectors</tt>–specifies additional web application connectors

Revision as of 03:17, 25 October 2011



Contents

Introduction

The Ant Jetty plugin is in the codehouse trunk in the jetty-ant module. This plugin makes it possible to start a Jetty web server directly from the Ant build script, and, to embed the Jetty web server inside your build process. Its purpose is to provide almost the same functionality as the Jetty plugin for Maven: dynamic application reloading, working directly on web application sources, and a tight integration with the build system.

Preparation

You will need a jetty distribution and the jetty-ant jar in order to set up your project for ant to run jetty:

  1. Get a jetty distribution and unpack it the local filesystem
  2. Get the jetty-ant jar
  3. Make a directory in your project called jetty-lib/
  4. Copy all of the jars in your jetty distribution's lib directory, and all its subdirectories, into your new jetty-lib dir. When copying the jars, DON'T preserve the jetty distro's lib dir hierarchy - all the jars should be directly inside your jetty-lib dir.
  5. Also copy the jetty-ant jar you downloaded earlier into the jetty-lib dir.
  6. Make a directory in your project called jetty-temp

Now you're ready to edit or create your Ant build.xml file.

Preparing the build.xml file

Let's start with an empty build.xml:

<project name="Jetty-Ant integration test" basedir=".">
</project>

Then, you must define a jetty task:

<project name="Jetty-Ant integration test" basedir=".">
  <path id="jetty.plugin.classpath">
     <fileset dir="jetty-lib" includes="*.jar"/>
  </path>
  <taskdef classpathref="jetty.plugin.classpath" resource="tasks.properties" loaderref="jetty.loader" />
</project>

Now you are ready to add a new target with Jetty container declaration:

<project name="Jetty-Ant integration test" basedir=".">
  <path id="jetty.plugin.classpath">
    <fileset dir="jetty-lib" includes="*.jar"/>
  </path>
  <taskdef classpathref="jetty.plugin.classpath" resource="tasks.properties" loaderref="jetty.loader" />
 
  <target name="jetty.run">
    <jetty />
  </target>
</project>

This is the minimal configuration need. You can now start jetty.

Starting Jetty via Ant

At the command line do:

ant jetty.run

Deploying web applications

To add web applications to the Jetty web server, now put extra webapp tags inside jetty tag. Notice, that a tempDirectory attribute has been added to the jetty task to specify where temporary files are stored.

 
<project name="Jetty-Ant integration test" basedir=".">
  <path id="jetty.plugin.classpath">
    <fileset dir="jetty-lib" includes="*.jar"/>
  </path>
  <taskdef classpathref="jetty.plugin.classpath" resource="tasks.properties" loaderref="jetty.loader" />
 
  <target name="jetty.run">
    <jetty tempDirectory="jetty-temp">
      <webApp name="webapp1" warfile="webapp1.war" contextpath="/webapp1" />
    </jetty>
  </target>
</project>

You can put many webapp tags inside jetty tag, thus deploying many web applications simultaneously.

A Special Note on Using JSPs with JSTL Or Other Taglibs

If your webapp uses a taglib that should be found on the container classpath (such as JSTL) you will need to pass in some extra information to the webapp to tell jetty which container jars can contain the taglibs. This is defined as a set of jar name patterns.

If you are using JSTL, and are using the jars provided by the standard jetty distribution, the JSTL taglibs are located in the jar named something like org.apache.taglibs.standard.glassfish_1.2.0.xxxx.jar (where xxx is replaced by a specific version number).

The following pattern defines all jars that contain the string "jsp-api" or "jsp" or "taglibs" as jars that will be searched at runtime for taglibs:

.*/.*jsp-api-[^/]*\.jar$|.*/.*jsp-[^/]*\.jar$|.*/.*taglibs[^/]*\.jar$


This pattern should be added to your <webApp/> declaration as the value of a context attribute named org.eclipse.jetty.server.webapp.ContainerIncludeJarPattern. Here's how the modified build.xml file looks now:

 
<project name="Jetty-Ant integration test" basedir=".">
  <path id="jetty.plugin.classpath">
    <fileset dir="jetty-lib" includes="*.jar"/>
  </path>
  <taskdef classpathref="jetty.plugin.classpath" resource="tasks.properties" loaderref="jetty.loader" />
 
  <target name="jetty.run">
    <jetty tempDirectory="jetty-temp">
      <webApp name="webapp1" warfile="webapp1.war" contextpath="/webapp1">
        <attributes>
          <attribute name="org.eclipse.jetty.server.webapp.ContainerIncludeJarPattern" value=".*/.*jsp-api-[^/]*\.jar$|.*/.*jsp-[^/]*\.jar$|.*/.*taglibs[^/]*\.jar$"/>
        </attributes>
      </webApp>
    </jetty>
  </target>
</project>

Plugin syntax

There are many ways to configure jetty tasks:

  • tempDirectory–specifies the Jetty temporary web directory:
 <jetty tempDirectory="jetty-temp" />
  • requestLog–defines a request logger:
 
 <jetty ... requestLog="your.fancy.request.logger"/>
  • jettyXml–applies additional configuration via a standard jetty.xml file:
 
 <jetty ... jettyXml="path/to/jetty.xml"/>
  • systemProperties–adds system properties when starting Jetty:
 
 <jetty ...>
   <systemProperties>
     <systemProperty name="jetty.status" value="Jetty Rocks!"/>
   </systemProperties>
 </jetty>
  • connectors–defines Jetty connectors:
 
 <typedef name="selectChannelConnector" classname="org.eclipse.jetty.nio.SelectChannelConnector"
                            classpathref="jetty.plugin.classpath" loaderref="jetty.loader" />
 ...
 <jetty ...>
   <connectors>
     <selectChannelConnector port="8090" />
   </connectors>
 </jetty>
  • loginServices - adds authentication via user "realms":
> 
 <typedef name="hashLoginService" classname="org.eclipse.jetty.security.HashLoginService"
                  classpathref="jetty.plugin.classpath" loaderref="jetty.loader" />
 ...
 <jetty ...>
   <loginServices>
     <hashLoginService name="realm1" config="path/to/realm/config" />
   </loginServices>
 </jetty>

There are also many ways to configure web applications with webapp tag:

  • name–name of a web application, which is used by DefaultServlet to display application description:
 
 <jetty ...>
   <webapp name="name" .../>
 </jetty>
  • warfile–path to .war file or a directory with web application contents:
 
 <jetty ...>
   <webapp warfile="/path/to/war/file/or/web/application/contents" .../>
 </jetty>
  • contextPath–a context path a particular web application will be deployed to, and thus where it will be accessible (http://localhost:8080/webapp in this case):
 
 <jetty ...>
   <webapp contextPath="/webapp" .../>
 </jetty>
 
 <jetty ...>
   <webapp jettyEnvXml="/path/to/jettyEnv.xml" .../>
 </jetty>
  • webXml–path to web.xml file. If not specified, the default (location-of-war-file/WEB-INF/web.xml) location is used:
 
 <jetty ...>
   <webapp webXmlFile="/path/to/web/xml" .../>
 </jetty>
  • scanTargets and scanIntervalSeconds–points to special files/folders that need to be scanned, and specifies scanner interval in seconds. If any of the files changes, the web application is automatically reloaded. You can adjust interval and scanned files per web application.
Note.png
All files included with <classes/> or <lib/> tags are automatically scanned for changes if you provide scanIntervalSeconds parameter in the <jetty/> tag. There's no need to add them using the <scanTargets/> section.
 <jetty ...>
   <webapp ... scanIntervalSeconds="5">
     <scanTargets dir="path/to/included/resources">
       <include name="filename/patterns" />
     </scanTargets>
   </webapp>
 </jetty>
  • lib–specifies which libraries need be included for a particular web application (treated as files inside WEB-INF/lib folder). Multiple lib tags are allowed.
 
 <jetty ...>
   <webapp ...>
     <lib dir="path/to/jar/folder" includes="*.jar" excludes="not-needed.jar" />
   </webapp>
 </jetty>
  • classes–specifies which folder contains web application classes (treated as WEB-INF/classes folder). Multiple classes tags are allowed.
 
 <jetty ...>
   <webapp ...>
     <classes dir="path/to/classes/folder" includes="*.class" />
   </webapp>
 </jetty>
  • connectors–specifies additional web application connectors