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Difference between revisions of "FAQ How do I create a form-based editor, such as the plug-in Manifest Editor?"

 
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The <tt>org.eclipse.ui.forms</tt> plug-in provides a  
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The <tt>org.eclipse.ui.forms</tt> plug-in provides a framework for building form-based editors. The components in this plug-in have long been the framework for building the PDE and Install/Update editors and views but have been made into official API only in the Eclipse 3.0 release.
framework for building form-based editors. The components in this
+
plug-in have long been the framework for building the PDE and Install/Update
+
editors and views but have been made into official API only in the Eclipse 3.0 release.
+
  
To give you a quick overview, a form-based editor is created by subclassing
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To give you a quick overview, a form-based editor is created by subclassing the abstract <tt>FormEditor</tt> class. This class allows you to add any number of tabbed pages, which can be either traditional editor components or form-based pages (<tt>IFormPage</tt>).  Each form page creates the displays for a single <tt>IForm</tt>, and each form may contain multiple <tt>FormPart</tt>s representing each section in the form. There are various flavors of <tt>IForm</tt> subtypes, depending on whether you want multiple sections, scrolling, or different layout styles.  An example of a form-based editor is the PDE plug-in Manifest Editor, implemented by the <tt>ManifestEditor</tt> class in the <tt>org.eclipse.pde.ui</tt> plug-in.
the abstract <tt>FormEditor</tt> class. This class allows you to add any number of
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tabbed pages, which can be either traditional editor components or form-based pages
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(<tt>IFormPage</tt>).  Each form page creates the displays for a single <tt>IForm</tt>,
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and each form may contain multiple <tt>FormPart</tt>s representing each  
+
section in the form. There are various flavors of <tt>IForm</tt> subtypes, depending
+
on whether you want multiple sections, scrolling, or different layout styles.  An
+
example of a form-based editor is the PDE plug-in Manifest Editor, implemented
+
by the <tt>ManifestEditor</tt> class in the <tt>org.eclipse.pde.ui</tt> plug-in.
+
  
 
<hr><font size=-2>This FAQ was originally published in [http://www.eclipsefaq.org Official Eclipse 3.0 FAQs]. Copyright 2004, Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. This text is made available here under the terms of the [http://www.eclipse.org/legal/epl-v10.html Eclipse Public License v1.0].</font>
 
<hr><font size=-2>This FAQ was originally published in [http://www.eclipsefaq.org Official Eclipse 3.0 FAQs]. Copyright 2004, Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. This text is made available here under the terms of the [http://www.eclipse.org/legal/epl-v10.html Eclipse Public License v1.0].</font>

Latest revision as of 20:51, 8 May 2007

The org.eclipse.ui.forms plug-in provides a framework for building form-based editors. The components in this plug-in have long been the framework for building the PDE and Install/Update editors and views but have been made into official API only in the Eclipse 3.0 release.

To give you a quick overview, a form-based editor is created by subclassing the abstract FormEditor class. This class allows you to add any number of tabbed pages, which can be either traditional editor components or form-based pages (IFormPage). Each form page creates the displays for a single IForm, and each form may contain multiple FormParts representing each section in the form. There are various flavors of IForm subtypes, depending on whether you want multiple sections, scrolling, or different layout styles. An example of a form-based editor is the PDE plug-in Manifest Editor, implemented by the ManifestEditor class in the org.eclipse.pde.ui plug-in.


This FAQ was originally published in Official Eclipse 3.0 FAQs. Copyright 2004, Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. This text is made available here under the terms of the Eclipse Public License v1.0.