Skip to main content
Jump to: navigation, search

Eclipse DemoCamp December 2016 Berlin

Revision as of 11:30, 17 November 2016 by Webmaster.eclipse.org (Talk | contribs) (Merge edit by Robert.hilbri.ch)

DemoCamp.png

1. Location

ThoughtWorks Deutschland GmbH
Werkstatt Berlin
Mühlhauser Straße 6
Hofgebäude 1. OG
10405 Berlin
Germany

2. Date and Time

December 5th, 2016

Registration: 6.00 pm
Opening: 6.30 pm
Presentations and Demos: 6.30 pm - 9.00 pm

3. Organizer

Max Bureck, Fraunhofer FOKUS
Tom Ritter, Fraunhofer FOKUS

4. Sponsors

FraunhoferFokus.png

The Eclipse DemoCamp will be sponsored by Fraunhofer FOKUS and the Eclipse Foundation.
We like to thank ThoughtWorks for providing the venue for the camp at their ThoughtWorks Werkstatt

• The Fraunhofer Institute for Open Communication Systems FOKUS is researching and developing demand-oriented solutions for partners in industry, research and public administration.
• Eclipse Foundation is a not-for-profit, member supported corporation that hosts the open-source Eclipse Projects.

If you or your company would like to sponsor food and/or drinks, please get in touch with Max or Tom.

5. Demo Proposals

If you would like to present please add your proposal to this section, or send a mail to max.bureck[at]fokus.fraunhofer.de. If you have a time constraint, feel free to add this information as well.

Should we receive more submissions than we can fit into the schedule, we will select the ones that we think are most interesting to the audience.

5.1 Akos Kitta (TypeFox GmbH): Connecting your Xtext language with the Monaco Editor using the Language Server Protocol

Microsoft has announced an open-source protocol [1] that one can use to add support for a new programming language to VS Code [2] by implementing a language server or by just installing an existing one into the tooling as an extension. VS Code is an IDE which is powered by the open-source Monaco Editor [3]. The communication between the Monaco Editor and the language server is done through the JSON-based Language Server Protocol (LSP). One of the fundamental characteristics of the Monaco Editor is that it can run in a browser outside of its home.

The LSP aims to change the game in tooling support. Most programming languages have been optimized for use with a single tool, which might limit the opportunities for language providers to reach a wider audience. The common protocol gives developers access to intelligence for many languages within their favorite tools. Developers can access language and tooling assistants including content proposal, live validation, syntax coloring, refactoring and much more within an IDE, a simple editor or even from a browser of their own choice.

In this short demo, I would like to briefly talk about the LSP4J [4], which is a Java implementation of the protocol. Then speak of the Xtext implementation of the language server briefly and last, but not least, I would like to show a Xtext DSL in action from the Monaco Editor.

[1]: https://github.com/Microsoft/language-server-protocol
[2]: https://github.com/Microsoft/vscode
[3]: https://github.com/Microsoft/monaco-editor
[4]: https://projects.eclipse.org/proposals/lsp4j

5.2 Lothar Wendehals (itemis AG): Program an Arduino with State Machines in 5 Minutes

Did you ever program an Arduino? Have you ever been worried about complex control flows written in pure C? Maybe you have already heard of statecharts and state machines? In this demo, I will show you how to program an Arduino in just 5 minutes in a model-driven way with the help of YAKINDU Statechart Tools (SCT).

http://statecharts.org
https://blogs.itemis.com/en/program-an-arduino-with-statemachines-in-5-minutes
https://github.com/wendehals/arduino_sct_tools

5.3. Max Bureck (Fraunhofer FOKUS): Oomph and Docker: Setting up your IDE and test environment in no time using the example of ModelBus

When a new developer joins a team he has to set up a bunch of software to be productive. Oomph helps when setting up an Eclipse based IDE environment and Docker helps to set up test services needed to run code against. This talk will show an IDE setup using Oomph and how to combine this with the Eclipse tools for Docker to get a dev and test environment for ModelBus set up in (almost) no time.

https://eclipse.org/oomph
https://www.docker.com/
https://eclipse.org/linuxtools/projectPages/docker/
http://www.modelbus.org/

5.4 Karl Hübner (Fraunhofer FOKUS): Virtual Testing of Connected and Automated Driving with VSimRTI

The assessment of new automated and cooperative functions of conventional and electric vehicles is a challenging task. The multi-aspect simulation environment VSimRTI is a comprehensive framework that connects various simulation tools together to cover all aspects needed for a proper evaluation of new cooperative mobility applications and Advanced Driver Assistance Systems. In a little Demo we will show, how use cases in this field can be implemented with the VSimRTI simulation framework.

https://www.dcaiti.tu-berlin.de/research/simulation
https://www.fokus.fraunhofer.de/go/asct

5.5 Michel Krämer (Fraunhofer IGD) Reactive Applications on the JVM with Eclipse Vert.x

Vert.x is a polyglot framework to write reactive server application for the JVM. This demo will introduce Vert.x and show a demo of Vert.x in action.

http://vertx.io/

5.6 Karsten Thoms (itemis AG): Boosting the Performance of your Eclipse IDE

Are you working on a rocket fast machine that could compute the answer to life the universe and everything within minutes, but still experience poor performance of Eclipse? You are not alone!

There are several things that can be considered to improve the overall performance of your Eclipse workbench. Some might be obvious, others not, and none of them does help on its own alone. Key factors are hardware, the operating system, running processes, over to the JVM and its settings, installed Eclipse features, preferences and, of course, the projects that you are working with in your workspace.

I will share in this session some tips that show how to boost the startup time, build times and overall experience when working with Eclipse.

5.7 J. Erdmann, R. Hilbrich (DLR): Traffic Simulation with SUMO

Simulating traffic becomes more and more important in the advent of autonomous driving. We present SUMO, an open source toolchain for creating simulations, which will soon be published and developed under the Eclipse Public License. We provide an introduction on how to get started and show case selected features.

SUMO

6. Agenda

Schedule is being adjusted according to the proposals. This is the current draft:

6.00 pm -- Registration
6.30 pm -- Opening
6:45 pm - 7:05 pm: Akos Kitta (TypeFox GmbH): Connecting your Xtext language with the Monaco Editor using the Language Server Protocol
7:10 pm - 7:30 pm: Michel Krämer (Fraunhofer IGD) Reactive Applications on the JVM with Eclipse Vert.x
7:35 pm - 7:55 pm: Lothar Wendehals (itemis AG): Program an Arduino with State Machines in 5 Minutes
7:55 pm - 8:30 pm: break

8:30 pm - 8:50 pm: Max Bureck (Fraunhofer FOKUS): Oomph and Docker: Setting up your IDE and test environment in no time using the example of ModelBus
8:55 pm - 9:15 pm: Karl Hübner (Fraunhofer FOKUS): Virtual Testing of Connected and Automated Driving with VSimRTI
9:20 pm - 9:40 pm: Karsten Thoms (itemis AG): Boosting the Performance of your Eclipse IDE

7. Who is attending

We encourage everyone to register via the ThoughtWorks meetup event:
https://www.meetup.com/de-DE/ThoughtWorks-Berlin/events/235596401/

Speakers and visitors, who do not want to register to meetup.com may register below:

Tom Ritter, Fraunhofer FOKUS
Max Bureck, Fraunhofer FOKUS
Akos Kitta, TypeFox GmbH
Jakub Siberski, NumberFour AG
Lothar Wendehals, itemis AG
Mark Brörkens, itemis AG
Karl Hübner, Fraunhofer FOKUS
Björn Schünemann, Fraunhofer FOKUS
Michel Krämer, Fraunhofer IGD
Karsten Thoms, itemis AG
Robert Hilbrich, DLR
Jakob Erdmann, DLR

Back to the top