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Difference between revisions of "EclipseLink/Examples/REST/GettingStarted/EntityModel"

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= Packaging/Deployment =
 
= Packaging/Deployment =
  
Ultimately we will package all the META-INF/pesistence.xml and our JPA entities in a JAR file.  We will hold off actually creating the JAR until we apply the XML representation using JAXB in part 3.
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Ultimately we will package all the META-INF/pesistence.xml and our JPA entities in a JAR file.  We will hold off actually creating the JAR until we apply the XML representation using JAXB in [[EclipseLink/Examples/REST/GettingStarted/XmlBinding|part 3]].
  
 
= Next Steps =
 
= Next Steps =
  
In the next part we will examine how to use the Java Architecture for XML Binding (JAXB) to apply an XML representation on the JPA entities (POJOs).
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In [[EclipseLink/Examples/REST/GettingStarted/XmlBinding|part 3]] we will examine how to use the Java Architecture for XML Binding (JAXB) to apply an XML representation on the JPA entities (POJOs).

Latest revision as of 14:52, 24 August 2010

Overview

Java Persistence Architecture (JPA) is the Java EE standard for mapping POJOs to a relational database. In this example we will use JPA to interact with our database model we set up in Database part 1.

JPA Entities

The following JPA entities can be created by hand, or the Eclipse Dali project can be used (http://www.eclipse.org/webtools/dali/). Dali has a useful feature where JPA entities can be generated from database tables.

Customer Entity

We want the customer, address, and phone number data to be treated as a unit. When a customer is added/removed we want the corresponding address and phone numbers to be added/removed. To accomplish this we will specify CascadeType.ALL on the address and phoneNumber relationships.

In addition to the database mappings, I've added a named query to the Customer entity. This query will give us all customers from a particular city.

package org.example;
 
import java.io.Serializable;
import javax.persistence.*;
import java.util.Set;
 
@Entity
@NamedQuery(name = "findCustomerByCity", 
            query = "SELECT c " +
                    "FROM Customer c " +
                    "WHERE c.address.city = :city")
public class Customer implements Serializable {
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
 
    @Id
    private long id;
 
    @Column(name="FIRST_NAME")
    private String firstName;
 
    @Column(name="LAST_NAME")
    private String lastName;
 
    @OneToOne(mappedBy="customer", cascade={CascadeType.ALL})
    private Address address;
 
    @OneToMany(mappedBy="customer", cascade={CascadeType.ALL})
    private Set<phonenumber> phoneNumbers;
 
    public long getId() {
        return this.id;
    }
 
    public void setId(long id) {
        this.id = id;
    }
 
    public String getFirstName() {
        return this.firstName;
    }
 
    public void setFirstName(String firstName) {
        this.firstName = firstName;
    }
 
    public String getLastName() {
        return this.lastName;
    }
 
    public void setLastName(String lastName) {
        this.lastName = lastName;
    }
 
    public Address getAddress() {
        return this.address;
    }
 
    public void setAddress(Address address) {
        this.address = address;
    }
 
    public Set<PhoneNumber> getPhoneNumbers() {
        return this.phoneNumbers;
    }
 
    public void setPhoneNumbers(Set<PhoneNumber> phoneNumbers) {
        this.phoneNumbers = phoneNumbers;
    }
 
}

Address Entity

package org.example;
 
import java.io.Serializable;
import javax.persistence.*;
 
@Entity
public class Address implements Serializable {
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
 
    @Id
    private long id;
 
    private String city;
 
    private String street;
 
    @OneToOne
    @PrimaryKeyJoinColumn
    private Customer customer;
 
    public long getId() {
        return this.id;
    }
 
    public void setId(long id) {
        this.id = id;
    }
 
    public String getCity() {
        return this.city;
    }
 
    public void setCity(String city) {
        this.city = city;
    }
 
    public String getStreet() {
        return this.street;
    }
 
    public void setStreet(String street) {
        this.street = street;
    }
 
    public Customer getCustomer() {
        return customer;
    }
 
    public void setCustomer(Customer customer) {
        this.customer = customer;
    }
 
}

PhoneNumber Entity

package org.example;
 
import java.io.Serializable;
import javax.persistence.*;
 
@Entity
@Table(name="PHONE_NUMBER")
public class PhoneNumber implements Serializable {
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
 
    @Id 
    private long id;
 
    private String num;
 
    private String type;
 
    @ManyToOne
    @JoinColumn(name="ID_CUSTOMER")
    private Customer customer;
 
    public long getId() {
        return this.id;
    }
 
    public void setId(long id) {
        this.id = id;
    }
 
    public String getNum() {
        return this.num;
    }
 
    public void setNum(String num) {
        this.num = num;
    }
 
    public String getType() {
        return this.type;
    }
 
    public void setType(String type) {
        this.type = type;
    }
 
    public Customer getCustomer() {
        return this.customer;
    }
 
    public void setCustomer(Customer customer) {
        this.customer = customer;
    }
 
}

META-INF/persistence.xml

For this example we will use the EclipseLink JPA implementation.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> 
<persistence version="1.0"
    xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence" 
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
    xsi:schemaLocation="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence/persistence_1_0.xsd">
    <persistence-unit name="CustomerService" transaction-type="JTA">
        <provider>org.eclipse.persistence.jpa.PersistenceProvider</provider>
        <jta-data-source>CustomerService</jta-data-source>
        <class>org.example.Customer</class>
        <class>org.example.Address</class>
        <class>org.example.PhoneNumber</class>
        <properties>
            <property name="eclipselink.target-database" value="Oracle" />
            <property name="eclipselink.logging.level" value="FINEST" />
            <property name="eclipselink.logging.level.ejb_or_metadata" value="WARNING" />
            <property name="eclipselink.logging.timestamp" value="false"/>
            <property name="eclipselink.logging.thread" value="false"/>
            <property name="eclipselink.logging.session" value="false"/>
            <property name="eclipselink.logging.exceptions" value="false"/> 
            <property name="eclipselink.target-server" value="SunAS9"/> 
        </properties>
    </persistence-unit>
</persistence>

Packaging/Deployment

Ultimately we will package all the META-INF/pesistence.xml and our JPA entities in a JAR file. We will hold off actually creating the JAR until we apply the XML representation using JAXB in part 3.

Next Steps

In part 3 we will examine how to use the Java Architecture for XML Binding (JAXB) to apply an XML representation on the JPA entities (POJOs).