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EclipseLink/Examples/REST/GettingStarted/DatabaseModel

Overview

The following database model will be used for this example. This particular database stores customer related information. I am using Oracle Database XE, but you could use almost any database with a JDBC driver.

CUSTOMER Table

CREATE TABLE "CUSTOMER" 
 ( "ID" NUMBER NOT NULL ENABLE, 
 "FIRST_NAME" VARCHAR2(50), 
 "LAST_NAME" VARCHAR2(50), 
 CONSTRAINT "CUSTOMER_PK" PRIMARY KEY ("ID") ENABLE
 )
/

ADDRESSS Table

CREATE TABLE "ADDRESS" 
 ( "ID" NUMBER NOT NULL ENABLE, 
 "STREET" VARCHAR2(50), 
 "CITY" VARCHAR2(50), 
 CONSTRAINT "ADDRESS_PK" PRIMARY KEY ("ID") ENABLE, 
 CONSTRAINT "ADDRESS_FK" FOREIGN KEY ("ID")
 REFERENCES "CUSTOMER" ("ID") ENABLE
 )
/
 

PHONE_NUMBER Table

CREATE TABLE "PHONE_NUMBER" 
 ( "ID" NUMBER NOT NULL ENABLE, 
 "TYPE" VARCHAR2(50), 
 "NUM" VARCHAR2(50), 
 "ID_CUSTOMER" NUMBER, 
 CONSTRAINT "PHONE_NUMBER_PK" PRIMARY KEY ("ID") ENABLE, 
 CONSTRAINT "PHONE_NUMBER_FK" FOREIGN KEY ("ID_CUSTOMER")
 REFERENCES "CUSTOMER" ("ID") ENABLE
 )
/
 

JDBC Resource & Connection Pool

Next we need to configure a connection pool on our application server. I will be using GlassFish Server Open Source Edition version 3.0.1. These steps will vary depending on the application server you are using.


  1. Copy the JDBC driver (ojdbc14.jar) to <glassfish_home>/glashfish/lib
  2. Launch the Administration Console
  3. Create a Connection Pool:
    1. Name = CustomerService
    2. Resource Type = 'javax.sql.ConnectionPoolDataSource'
    3. Database Vendor = Oracle (or whatever database vendor is appropriate to your database)
  4. Click Next and fill in the following "Additional Properties":
    1. User (e.g. CustomerService)
    2. Password (e.g. password)
    3. URL (e.g. jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521:XE)
    4. Use the "Ping" button to test your database connection
  5. Create a JDBC Resource called "CustomerService"
    1. JNDI Name = CustomerService
    2. Pool Name = CustomerService (name of the connection pool you created in the previous step)

Next Steps

In the next part we will examine how to use the Java Persistence Architecture (JPA) to expose the database data as entities (POJOs).