Difference between revisions of "EclipseLink/Examples/MOXy/JAXB"

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==Overview==
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{{EclipseLink_DocWiki
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|link=EclipseLink/UserGuide/MOXy/Overview/JAXB}}
  
The following example will demonstrate how to use EclipseLink's JAXB functionality to:
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==  Using EclipseLink MOXy JAXB ==
* Generate JAXB-annotated Java classes from an XML Schema using the JAXB Compiler
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Java Architecture for XML Binding (JSR 222) is the standard for XML Binding in JavaJAXB covers 100% of XML Schema concepts. Learn how to use MOXy as your JAXB provider.:
* Unmarshal an XML Document
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* [[EclipseLink/Examples/MOXy/JAXB/Compiler | Generating a Java Model from an XML Schema]]
* Modify the XML data using the interfaces generated by the compiler
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* [[EclipseLink/Examples/MOXy/JAXB/SpecifyRuntime | Specifying the EclipseLink MOXy JAXB Runtime]]
* Marshal the modified data to XML
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* [[EclipseLink/Examples/MOXy/JAXB/Runtime | Using JAXB to Manipulate XML]]
 
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* [[EclipseLink/Examples/MOXy/JAXB/GenerateSchema | Generating an XML Schema from a Java Model]]
==Setup==
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# Ensure that you have EclipseLink correctly installed and configured for your environmentPlease see [[EclipseLink/Installing and Configuring EclipseLink]] for more information.
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# Ensure that you have ANT correctly installed and configured.
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# Unzip the Example ZIP file to a new directory.
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# Edit the <tt>env.properties</tt> file in the root directory of the example and specify the path to your EclipseLink <tt>jlib</tt> directory:
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<source>
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...
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# Edit eclipselink.jlib to point to your EclipseLink jlib directory
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eclipselink.jlib=C:/EclipseLink-1.0/eclipselink/jlib
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...
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</pre>
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You can compile and run the Example at any time by typing <tt>ant</tt> from the Example directory. 
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==Running the JAXB Compiler==
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The JAXB compiler can be run to generate JAXB-annotated Java classes from an XML Schema:
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<pre>
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<ECLIPSELINK_HOME>/eclipselink/bin/jaxb-compiler.sh <source-file.xsd> [-options]
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<ECLIPSELINK_HOME>\eclipselink\bin\jaxb-compiler.cmd <source-file.xsd> [-options]
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Options include:
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  -d <dir>                    Specifies the output directory for generated files
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  -p <pkg>                    Specifies the target package
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  -classpath <arg>            Specifies where to find user class files
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  -verbose                    Enable verbose output
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  -quiet                      Suppress compiler output
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  -version                    Display version information
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For a complete list of compiler options:
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  jaxb-compiler.sh -help
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Example:
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  jaxb-compiler.sh -d jaxb-compiler-output config/Customer.xsd
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</pre>
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In this example, the JAXB Compiler is run from the "<tt>run.jaxb.compiler</tt>" task in the ANT build file.
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==Creating a JAXBContext using jaxb.properties==
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The standard way to specify which JAXB implementation should be used is through a file called <tt>jaxb.properties</tt>, which contains a single property, <tt>javax.xml.bind.context.factory</tt>. This file must be available on the classpath in the corresponding package (in this example, "<tt>org.example.customer_example</tt>").  To specify that the EclipseLink JAXB implementation should be used, your <tt>jaxb.properties</tt> file should have the following content:
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<pre>
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javax.xml.bind.context.factory=org.eclipse.persistence.jaxb.JAXBContextFactory
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</pre>
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In our example, we create the JAXBContext as follows:
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<pre>
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JAXBContext jaxbContext = JAXBContext.newInstance("org.example.customer_example");
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</pre>
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An alternate way to create a new JAXBContext is to supply an array of Class objects.  Again, the <tt>jaxb.properties</tt> file must be available on the classpath in the corresponding package:
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<pre>
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Class[] classes = new Class[4];
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classes[0] = org.example.customer_example.AddressType.class;
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classes[1] = org.example.customer_example.ContactInfo.class;
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classes[2] = org.example.customer_example.CustomerType.class;
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classes[3] = org.example.customer_example.PhoneNumber.class;
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JAXBContext jaxbContext = JAXBContext.newInstance(classes);
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</pre>
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==Unmarshalling the XML Document==
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With a JAXBContext created, we can now unmarshal an XML document using the statically generated classes:
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<pre>
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File file = new File("Customer-data.xml");
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Unmarshaller unmarshaller = jaxbContext.createUnmarshaller();
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StreamSource source = new StreamSource(file);
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JAXBElement customerElement = unmarshaller.unmarshal(source, CustomerType.class);
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CustomerType customer = (CustomerType) customerElement.getValue();
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</pre>
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==Modify the Objects==
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Below are examples of manipulating the XML data using the JAXB-generated static classes. Note that there are JavaBean-type accessors on the static interfaces.
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Modifying the ShippingAddress ZipCode:
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<pre>
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customer.getContactInfo().getShippingAddress().setZipCode("27601");
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</pre>
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Adding a new PhoneNumber:
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<pre>
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PhoneNumber homePhoneNumber  = new ObjectFactory().createPhoneNumber();
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homePhoneNumber.setType("home");
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homePhoneNumber.setValue("(613) 555-3333");
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customer.getContactInfo().getPhoneNumber().add(homePhoneNumber);
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</pre>
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Note the use of the <tt>ObjectFactory</tt> class to create a new <tt>PhoneNumber</tt> object.  In addition to generating the model classes used in this example, the JAXB compiler also generates an <tt>ObjectFactory</tt> class that can be used to create any of the generated types.
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Removing all "cell" PhoneNumbers:
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<pre>
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ArrayList phoneNumbersToRemove = new ArrayList();
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List phoneNumbers = customer.getContactInfo().getPhoneNumber();
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Iterator it = phoneNumbers.iterator();
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while (it.hasNext()) {
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    PhoneNumber phoneNumber = (PhoneNumber) it.next();
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    if (phoneNumber.getType().equals("cell")) {
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        phoneNumbersToRemove.add(phoneNumber);
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    }
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}
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phoneNumbers.removeAll(phoneNumbersToRemove);
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</pre>
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==Download==
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[http://wiki.eclipse.org/images/8/85/Org.eclipse.persistence.example.jaxb.zip org.eclipse.persistence.example.jaxb.zip]
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Revision as of 10:07, 4 January 2011

Using EclipseLink MOXy JAXB

Java Architecture for XML Binding (JSR 222) is the standard for XML Binding in Java. JAXB covers 100% of XML Schema concepts. Learn how to use MOXy as your JAXB provider.: